Nuevo para Chrome: acceso directo de incógnito, finalización diferida para aplicaciones de Chrome y píldoras de búsqueda de tendencias

Less is more: how Google wants to prevent phishing in the Chrome browser

A classic URL used to consist of several individual parts, all of which were also visible in the address bar. In recent years, people with malicious ideas have repeatedly taken advantage of this fact, for example, to trick web addresses into being trustworthy for phishing. In the case of a particularly long URL with a wide variety of fragments, it may not be possible to recognize it in […]



A classic URL used to consist of several individual parts, all of which were also visible in the address bar. In recent years, people with malicious ideas have repeatedly taken advantage of this fact, for example, to trick web addresses into being trustworthy for phishing. In the case of a particularly long URL with a wide variety of fragments, it may not be possible to recognize which website the user is on. To avoid this in the future, Google will drastically change the display of the address bar of its Chrome browser in the future.

Google wants to significantly shorten and simplify the display of URLs

With the presentation that will soon be greatly simplified, the user can more quickly see if and where they are actually on a website protected via HTTPS. The less important parts of the URL are abbreviated, which distracts the user from the really important details and that inexperienced users will probably not be able to do anything anyway. The focus is back on the base of the URL, including the main Lovel domain. The following example shows what this might look like in the future:

At first glance, the user sees the name of the website and also if this website is protected via HTTPS. All other components are only visible with a click or fingertip in the address bar. Google is already removing the HTTP: // and WWW components. One of the reasons for this is that you no longer have to enter these components to open a website. Many users don’t know what to do with it anyway.

9to5Google