Carga de teléfonos inteligentes con 80W: ¿nuevamente, solo para prototipos?

The history of the uniform charger for smartphones in the EU

For example, we also reported in 2014 that there was a fundamental agreement in the EU to make standardized power supplies mandatory for manufacturers of smartphones and similar devices. Now the issue comes up again in the EU Parliament, as nothing has happened yet. Work continues on a final solution, until now it only applies […]



For example, we also reported in 2014 that there was a fundamental agreement in the EU to make standardized power supplies mandatory for manufacturers of smartphones and similar devices. Now the issue comes up again in the EU Parliament, as nothing has happened yet. Work continues on a final solution, so far only voluntary agreements apply. Apple still relies on a completely separate connection, while the Android competition now at least relies on USB-C across the board and is therefore fairly uniform.

Apple sees itself as a pioneer and doesn’t want to be forced to use a different charging connection

Apple recently said this: “Apple is synonymous with innovation. Regulations that encourage compliance with all types of connectors built into smartphones freeze innovation rather than promote it. These suggestions are bad for the environment and unnecessarily bother customers. ” Furthermore, Apple believes that the market for its own smartphones with a Lightning connector, including accessories, is too large, and that a corresponding law would only ultimately guarantee that when the connector is changed, one thing is certain. “Unprecedented volume of e-waste” arises.

For manufacturers, the sale of accessories is a lucrative line of business in its own right. Apple in particular doesn’t want it taken away. Also, several major economic areas should work together to find uniform solutions. What European politicians keep doing can be argued over sensations and nonsense. You can also see how it communicates to the outside world. The last paragraph of the Netzpolitik article says a lot about politics in Europe:

In response to a freedom of information request from netzpolitik.org, the commission sent us the draft, which contains expert recommendations on how to proceed. Of the 166 pages of the studies, all but three (the title page, the index and the first page of the introduction) were crossed out. The Commission seems to want to postpone any debate on the subject.